The Problem With Equine Dandruff


PRIMARY SEBORRHEA (DANDRUFF):

Appearance: Seborrhea can be dry or oily. In the dry form, small flakes of skin appear routinely, usually at the base of the mane and tail, and sand-like flecks may appear on the girth area or anywhere sweat accumulates. Oily seborrhea causes large, waxy crusts, often on the elbows, hocks or lower legs; when peeled off, these may leave hairless patches up to several inches in diameter. Dandruff sometimes causes a fetid odor, but the horse is not usually itchy or in pain.

Causes: Heredity plays a significant role in cases of primary seborrhea, and it is more common in Arabians and Thoroughbreds. In affected individuals, dandruff is likely to be a lifelong issue. Please note, however, that primary seborrhea looks just like secondary seborrhea, which can also be either oily or dry. The biggest difference is that secondary seborrhea develops in horses that had not previously experienced the condition, although the onset can be very gradual. Secondary seborrhea is a sign that can accompany several potentially serious illnesses, including liver or intestinal disease.

Do I need to treat it? No, but most people prefer to do so for aesthetic reasons.

Protocol: Primary seborrhea is not curable, but it can be managed. A number of anti-dandruff shampoos are available that, when used as directed, can dissolve flakes and loosen oily scales. It's best to choose products formulated for use on horses; human products can be too harsh. Gentle scrubbing with a soft- to medium-bristled brush can help remove crusts. Secondary seborrhea is likely to clear up when the underlying disease is treated.

Natural oil production that help keep the skin healthy and clean. Feeding vegetable oils, especially omega-3 fatty acids, and supplements that contain biotin may also help promote healthier skin. Talk to your veterinarian or an equine nutritionist before making changes in your horse's diet.

Prevention: Regular grooming stimulates circulation and natural oil production that help keep the skin healthy and clean. Feeding vegetable oils, especially omega-3 fatty acids, and supplements that contain biotin may also help promote healthier skin. Talk to your equine nutritionist before making changes in your horse's diet.

Here a weekly Low Level Red Light Therapy is to be the required protocol for a period of two to three weeks to aid in the closing of the possible lesions that have been created. The uses of Essential Oils are to also be part of the overall protocol to help the horse cope with the program. After each Red Light/Essential Oil Therapy session an herbal based salve is to be applied to the affected areas.

The herbal based salve is to also be administered between each Low Level Red Light/Essential Oil Therapy session to continue the process of soothing, softening, and closing of the lesions. Remember, to use the salve only after the Low Level Red Light/Essential Oil Therapy session has been completed due to the fact that a discomfort factor may be realized through the process created by the Red Light Therapy.

Any thoughts or experiences?.....

Until Next Time …. “Ride for the Brand”

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